COVID-19 Updates

COVID-19 UPDATE

The NHS in London is very busy due to rising coronavirus infection rates, but we’ll help you get urgent care when you need it.

We are providing more appointments, including evenings and weekends, for patients with urgent health needs. 

You can also contact 111, day or night, for other urgent health advice - including if you have concerns about your Covid-19 symptoms.

Please remember that 999 and A&E are for emergencies.

Thank you for following the lockdown rules, which will help reduce infections, protect the NHS and keep each other safe.

COVID-19 VACCINATION 

The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from coronavirus.

In England, the vaccine is being offered in some hospitals and pharmacies, at local vaccination centres run by GPs and at larger vaccination centres. More centres are opening all the time.

It's being given to:

  • people aged 40 and over

  • people at high risk from coronavirus (clinically extremely vulnerable)

  • people who live or work in care homes

  • health and social care workers

  • people with a condition that puts them at higher risk (clinically vulnerable)

  • people who are a main carer for someone at high risk from coronavirus

The order in which people will be offered the vaccine is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

In City & Hackney, we are offering the vaccine across 2 Sites - a) Bocking Street Centre b) John Scott Health Centre 

The Surgery will contact patients when they are eligible to have their Vaccination.

The Government aim to offer all patients aged over 18 their first vaccination before the end of July 2021.

Please do not hesitate to contact on 02072542298 if you require any further information. 

AZ VACCINATION AND BLOOD CLOTS 

What is the concern?

Recently there have been reports of a very rare condition involving blood clots and unusual bleeding after vaccination. This is being carefully reviewed but the risk factors for this condition are not yet clear. Although this condition remains extremely rare there appears to be a higher risk in people shortly after the frst dose of the AstraZeneca (AZ) vaccine. Around 4 people develop this condition for every million doses of AZ vaccine doses given. This is seen slightly more often in younger people and tends to occur between 4 days and 2 weeks following vaccination. This condition can also occur naturally, and clotting problems are a common complication of COVID-19 infection. An increased risk has not yet been seen after other COVID-19 vaccines but is being carefully monitored.

What should I do next?

Over 50 years of age or with underlying medical conditions:

All older adults (including health and social care workers over 50 years of age), care home residents, health and social care workers* and adults with certain medical conditions were prioritised in the frst phase of the programme because they were at high risk of the complications of COVID-19. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that you should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefts of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the frst dose. If your frst dose was with AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should have the second dose on time as you may still be at high risk of the complications of COVID-19. Having the second dose will give you higher and longer lasting protection.

If you are a healthy person over 30 to 50 years of age:

The MHRA and the JCVI advises that all adults in this age group (including health and social care workers) should still receive any of the available COVID-19 vaccines. The benefts of vaccination in protecting you against the serious consequences of COVID-19 outweigh any risk of this rare condition. You should also complete your course with the same vaccine you had for the frst dose.

If you are a healthy younger person aged 18 to 29

The MHRA and the JCVI continue to monitor the benefts and safety of the AZ vaccine in younger people. You should carefully consider the risk to both you and your family and friends of COVID-19 before making a decision. Currently JCVI has advised that it is preferable for people under 30 to have a vaccine other than AZ. If you choose to have another COVID-19 vaccine you may have to wait to be protected. You may wish to go ahead with the AZ vaccination after you have considered all the risks and benefts for you.

What about the second dose?

If you have already had a first dose of AZ vaccine without suffering any serious side effects you should complete the course. This includes people aged 18 to 29 years who are health and social care workers, unpaid carers and family members of those who are immunosuppressed. It is expected that the frst dose of the vaccine will have given you some protection, particularly against severe disease.

Please see the useful link below for more information: 

AZ vaccine and Blood Clots

COVID VACCINATIONS AND HISTORY OF EPILEPSY 

We have received some queries regarding patients with a history of epilepsy and whether COVID19 vaccines can cause epileptic seizures. There is no evidence to suggest that vaccination may be triggering epileptic seizures in individuals with a history of epilepsy.

However, Epilepsy Action has recommended that for those in whom a fever can increase the likelihood of a seizure, a fever-reducing medicine such as paracetamol is recommended for 48 hours after vaccination. More information here: https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/daily-life/safety/coronavirus-covid-19#will-people-with-epilepsy-be-more-affected



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